There are 2 translations of equivalent in Spanish:

equivalent1

Pronunciation: /ɪˈkwɪvələnt/

adj

  • 1.1 (equal) [size/value] equivalente to be equivalent to sth equivaler a algo $100 US was roughly equivalent to £50 sterling 100 dólares americanos equivalían or eran equivalentes a unas 50 libras esterlinas his request was equivalent to a demand su petición era poco menos que una exigencia to be equivalent to -ing equivaler a + inf it is equivalent to increasing our prices by 7% equivale a aumentar nuestros precios en un 7% 1.2 (corresponding) [position/term] equivalente to be equivalent to sth ser* el equivalente de algo

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of equivalent in Spanish:

equivalent2

n

  • equivalente (m) there isn't an exact English equivalent for that word en inglés no hay (un) equivalente exacto de esa palabra

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.