Translation of erase in Spanish:

erase

Pronunciation: /ɪˈreɪs; ɪˈreɪz/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (rub out) [pencil mark/error] borrar the teacher erased the blackboard (American English/inglés norteamericano) la profesora borró el pizarrón
    More example sentences
    • A sudden smile can smooth it free of tension as easily as the tide can erase marks on sand.
    • The kids glanced up at me, and some started erasing their marks.
    • Remarkably, seven days later her mark was erased.
    1.2 [Audio] [Computing/Informática] borrar
    More example sentences
    • Just like erasing a magnetic hard disk does not delete all the information stored on the disk, common erasure methods for tapes do not erase all of the data on the tape.
    • The degaussing process is designed to erase the tape magnetically back to a virgin state.
    • A file in the Recycle Bin is not erased from your computer until you select ‘Empty the Recycle Bin’ from the File menu.
    1.3 [literary/literario] [emotion] borrar [literary/literario] she tried to erase the dreadful scenes from her mind trató de borrar or apartar las terribles escenas de su pensamiento [literary/literario]
    More example sentences
    • If women participated in this myth-making in order to understand themselves and their place in the world, the traces have been erased or repressed.
    • In some parts of Latin America, there's been an attempt to erase many of the traces of liberation theology in any of its forms.
    • That element of my nightmare had been erased, diminished, dissolved.

Definition of erase in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.