Translation of farce in Spanish:

farce

Pronunciation: /fɑːrs; fɑːs/

n

  • 1.1 countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable [Literature/Literatura] [Theater/Teatro] farsa (feminine)
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    • On stage he has played character roles in farces, pantomime, comedies and serious drama.
    • His writings, which include more than thirty-five comedies, farces, adaptations, comic operas, and other light-hearted stage entertainments, were collected in 1798.
    • His early works included songs, piano sonatas, and choral pieces, but from 1826 to 1833 he wrote music for burlesques, farces, and melodramas.
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    • Only light comedy survived as a distinct genre akin to farce.
    • George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare have used farce to highlight patient vulnerability to unscrupulous physicians.
    • His direction is tight, keeping a brisk pace and gaining the most out of broad farce and high drama.
    1.2 (fiasco) (no plural/sin plural) farsa (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Players who made their sixes and sevens before the watering were not allowed to go back to try again, rendering the whole event a farce.
    • Because the Government has chosen to reduce the election to a farce, and the Opposition has decided to raise barely a squeak, I have decided not to waste my vote in a pointless exercise.
    • Last week the Chief Constable rightly pulled the plug on the political farce that the peace process has descended into.

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Word of the day esporádicamente
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sporadically …
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The PAN (Partido de Acción Nacional) is the political party that won the Mexican general elections in 2000, breaking the Partido Revolucional Institucional's record of 71 years in power. PRI - Partido Revolucionario InstitucionalPAN was founded in 1939 as a conservative alternative to President, Lázaro Cárdenas. It presents an image of being a defender of popular causes, but takes an individualistic approach to matters of education and property. Its traditional policies include limiting state intervention in the economy to a minimum and bringing about a greater rapprochement between the government and the church.