Translation of farce in Spanish:

farce

Pronunciation: /fɑːrs; fɑːs/

n

  • 1.1 c u [Lit] [Theat] farsa (f)
    More example sentences
    • On stage he has played character roles in farces, pantomime, comedies and serious drama.
    • His writings, which include more than thirty-five comedies, farces, adaptations, comic operas, and other light-hearted stage entertainments, were collected in 1798.
    • His early works included songs, piano sonatas, and choral pieces, but from 1826 to 1833 he wrote music for burlesques, farces, and melodramas.
    More example sentences
    • Only light comedy survived as a distinct genre akin to farce.
    • George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare have used farce to highlight patient vulnerability to unscrupulous physicians.
    • His direction is tight, keeping a brisk pace and gaining the most out of broad farce and high drama.
    1.2 (fiasco) (no pl) farsa (f)
    More example sentences
    • Players who made their sixes and sevens before the watering were not allowed to go back to try again, rendering the whole event a farce.
    • Because the Government has chosen to reduce the election to a farce, and the Opposition has decided to raise barely a squeak, I have decided not to waste my vote in a pointless exercise.
    • Last week the Chief Constable rightly pulled the plug on the political farce that the peace process has descended into.

Definition of farce in:

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