There are 2 translations of fare in Spanish:

fare1

Pronunciation: /fer; feə(r)/

n

  • 1 1.1 c (cost of travel — by air) pasaje (m) or (Esp) billete (m); (— by bus) boleto (m) or (esp Esp) billete (m) how much o what is the fare to Athens? ¿cuánto cuesta el boleto or (Esp) el billete a Atenas? what's the taxi fare? ¿cuánto sale ir en taxi? she'd lost her bus fare había perdido el dinero para el autobús taxi fares are going up las tarifas de los taxis van a subir or aumentar low fares pasajes or (Esp) billetes baratos you travel half fare tú pagas medio pasaje ( or billete etc) exact fare only no se da cambio 1.2 c (passenger) pasajero, -ra (m,f)
  • 2 u (food and drink) comida (f), platos (mpl) the restaurant serves traditional fare el restaurante tiene una carta tradicional

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of fare in Spanish:

fare2

vi

  • [liter or journ] how did she fare in her exams? ¿cómo le fue en los exámenes? the poor have fared badly under this government los pobres han salido mal parados bajo este gobierno fare thee well [archaic/arcaico] ve con Dios [anticuado/dated], que te vaya bien

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.