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fart

Pronunciation: /fɑːrt; fɑːt/

Translation of fart in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (gas) [vulgar] pedo (masculine) [colloquial/familiar] 1.2 (person) [slang/argot] a boring old fart un pesado de mierda [vulgar]
    Example sentences
    • We know also that farts are warm (not hot), so I'll add that: a fart is warm wind emitted from the anus.
    • Nature decided to put an abrupt end to our finger-pointing conspiracy theorists' dialogue, when a deafening fart emptied from the anus of someone soundly asleep downstairs.
    • If I can remember what I learned in junior high school regarding tornadoes, they're some kind of thing which is made up of wind, like a fart but only much more powerful.
    Example sentences
    • I'm a boring old fart, who values her money, and won't buy him a brand new shirt to chop holes in so he can look like a pirate.
    • I'm being a boring old fart so I'm in my room getting ready to go to bed.
    • On television, there was some boring old fart in a suit talking about the dangers of credit growth.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [vulgar] tirarse or echarse un pedo [colloquial/familiar], pedorrearse [colloquial/familiar]

Phrasal verbs

fart around

(especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) fart about verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
[slang/argot] perder* el tiempo

Definition of fart in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales