Translation of ferment in Spanish:

ferment

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

/fərˈment; fəˈment/
  • 1.1 [Chemistry/Química] [Cookery/Cocina] (hacer*) fermentar
    More example sentences
    • Without lactase, milk and other lactose-rich foods ferment in the intestine, releasing excessive gas.
    • Next, the juice is placed in stainless steel tanks or oak barrels where the wine will ferment following the addition of yeast.
    • When milk ferments, naturally or aided by chemicals in the dairy, the milk changes into a solid fraction and a watery fraction (whey).
    More example sentences
    • People in ancient China, India and the Mediterranean region employed biochemistry for making bread with yeast, fermenting beer and wine, and treating diseases with plant and animal extracts.
    • The starch stored in natural plant sugars is harvested and then the sugar is fermented into lactic acid.
    • In this case, the beer is fully fermented, then filtered to remove the yeast, then carbonated and stored in a tightly sealed keg, ready for immediate drinking.
    1.2 (stir up) [trouble/unrest] fomentar
    More example sentences
    • I would not want anything to be said in relation to that that would ferment any problems.
    • The problem is, that we can't ferment the democratic revolution ourselves, because most of the democratizers seem to be saying to us, keep your distance.
    • ‘The principal and his henchmen blamed us for fermenting trouble and putting dangerous ideas in the heads of young people,’ he says.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

/fərˈment; fəˈment/

noun/nombre

/ˈfɜːrment/

Definition of ferment in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.