Translation of flair in Spanish:

flair

Pronunciation: /fler; fleə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (natural aptitude) (no plural/sin plural) she has a flair for languages tiene facilidad para los idiomas he showed a flair for music at an early age desde muy pequeño demostró aptitudes musicales or talento musical he has a flair for knowing what to say on such occasions tiene el don de saber qué decir en este tipo de ocasiones she has a flair for business tiene olfato para los negocios
    More example sentences
    • He had a flair for drawing and an ability to grasp and execute delicate model settings.
    • They are coming to Bangalore to hunt for some gifted youngsters, with a flair for acting.
    • He was gifted with his hands and had a natural flair for wood-turning and carpentry.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable (stylishness) estilo (masculine) she dresses with flair tiene estilo or arte para vestirse
    More example sentences
    • Judges placed high value on entries that demonstrated imagination, originality and flair.
    • She went for a formal and textured look with a touch of modernity and lots of flair and originality.
    • He did, however, have an innate grasp of public relations, dressing with flair so people would notice him.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.