Translation of flask in Spanish:

flask

Pronunciation: /flæsk; flɑːsk/

noun/nombre

  • (bottle) frasco (masculine); (in laboratory) matraz (masculine), redoma (feminine)
    (hip flask)
    petaca (feminine), nalguera (feminine) (Mexico/México)
    (vacuum flask)
    (British English/inglés británico) termo (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • One of the flasks holds an oily liquid approximating to coffee while the other holds almost-boiling water that might nearly brew a half-strength cup of extra-weak tea.
    • With a few gurgling noises created from his throat, and, evidently, some mucus, he filled the glass to a quarter inch below the brim with the liquid in the flask.
    • He uncorked it, and poured the clear liquid into the flask.
    More example sentences
    • Levengood tested the metal fragment for the presence of hydrogen by putting a sample in a flask with a weak solution of acetic acid.
    • The GA solution was dried in a rotor evaporator and then incubated under vacuum overnight in a reagent flask.
    • They put methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide in a flask with some water, sparked some electricity through it, and after a week they got a brown sludge which contained amino acids.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.