Translation of flatten in Spanish:

flatten

Pronunciation: /ˈflætn/

vt

  • 1.1 (make flat) [surface/metal] aplanar; [path/lawn] allanar, aplanar; [hat] achatar, aplastar he flattened himself against the wall se pegó bien a la pared
    More example sentences
    • Secondly, the mixture is then flattened out in the blending machine, and then it is flattened further in an extruder machine.
    • The heavy boots he wore had long ago flattened and grass he walked on, making a perfectly straight path where he had paced for the past few hours.
    • She quickly brushed, combed, and flattened her hair.
    1.2 (knock down) [trees] tumbar, echar or tirar abajo; [city] arrasar he flattened his opponent with a single blow tumbó a su contrincante de un solo golpe
    More example sentences
    • The army has used its newly acquired firepower to flatten houses and other buildings, destroy coconut plantations and turn the city into a virtual ghost town.
    • But the torrent of brown water, which was already flattening buildings, wiped out the jeep, drowning her grandchildren.
    • Just 12 minutes after the order, the bombs were dropped from an altitude of 20,000 ft, flattening the building.
    More example sentences
    • A vision of me stepping on him, wobbling and then falling on him, flattening him like a pancake flashed through my head.
    • I was about to wish for a rock to fall off the sky and flatten me into a very slow and painful death, when the doorbell rang.
    • He said: ‘The old guy looked in good shape and I'm sure he would have flattened the other guy - if he could have caught him.’
    1.3 (especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) [Music/Música] bajar de tono

vi

  • [countryside/landscape] allanarse, volverse* más llano; [voice] volverse* más monótono

Definition of flatten in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day constipado
adj
está muy constipado = he has a bad cold …
Cultural fact of the day

The Senado is the name of the upper chamber of the Spanish Cortes Generales, and the place where it meets. There are 250 senators, most of whom are elected every four years, at general elections, four from each province. A small number of senators are also elected by the autonomous governments. The Senado's functions include discussing, approving, and suggesting amendments to legislation passed by the Congreso de los Diputados and supervising the compensation fund for the autonomous regions.