Translation of flint in Spanish:

flint

Pronunciation: /flɪnt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 u and c [Geology/Geología] sílex (masculine), pedernal (masculine); (piece of stone) pedernal (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [ax/arrowhead] de sílex
    More example sentences
    • Silica precipitated from aqueous solution at low temperatures gives cryptocrystalline varieties such as opal, jasper, chalcedony, agate, carnelian, onyx, flint, and chert.
    • It passes upwards into almost flat-lying white coccolith chalk with parallel lines of black flint nodules.
    • The artifacts recovered from these excavations will give a clearer picture of the technology and particularly their production and use of flint and chert.
    More example sentences
    • It was associated with a cobbled ‘work area’ covered by vast quantities of pottery, five stone axes, a number of broken tools and flints.
    • The site is dated by large quantities of Mesolithic flints, such as crescent-shaped microliths, scrapers and points.
    • Excavations at the site produced over 300 worked flints of early-middle Mesolithic type.
    1.2 countable/numerable (implement) sílex (masculine) 1.3 countable/numerable (for cigarette lighter) piedra (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • For example, an alloy of calcium and cerium is used in flints in cigarette and other types of lighters.
    • Misch metal is used to make the flint in cigarette lighters.
    • Lauren sparked her flints together against the wood.

Definition of flint in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.