Translation of fortification in Spanish:

fortification

Pronunciation: /ˌfɔːrtəfəˈkeɪʃən; ˌfɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃən/

n

  • 1 countable/numerable (defensive works) [Military/Militar] (often plural/frecuentemente plural) fortificación (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Mortars were originally developed for siege warfare to lob munitions over walls and other fortifications.
    • Improved protective designs for field fortifications and base camps have been developed for field forces.
    • Furthermore, illegal fortifications violate the DMZ virtually to the centerline.
    More example sentences
    • Not about to sit by idly as other categories steal their calcium franchise, dairy processors have turned to fortification to recapture share of stomach.
    • A much more realistic option is to start with soup, and if you need a little more fortification, slug some brandy into your coffee.
    • In some measure, this attitude to fortification reflected the contemporary state of military engineering art in the West and Russia.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (act of fortifying) [Military/Militar] fortificación (feminine) I could do with a little fortification [humorous/humorístico] no me vendría mal un reconstituyente [humorous/humorístico]

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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.