There are 2 translations of fortissimo in Spanish:

fortissimo1

Pronunciation: /fɔːrˈtɪsɪməʊ; fɔːˈtɪsɪməʊ/

adj, adv

  • [Music/Música] fortissimo
    More example sentences
    • Polk's coloration, her contrasts between pianissimo and fortissimo moments, are similar to Sviatoslav Richter's rendition of César Franck's Piano Quintet.
    • Mendelssohn uses the 6/8 time to introduce a theme which is not Scottish at all and finishes fortissimo.
    • The D minor fortissimo outburst at letter C always reminds me of Moses on the Mount admonishing Aaron and the sinners below.

Definition of fortissimo in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of fortissimo in Spanish:

fortissimo2

n

  • [Music/Música] fortissimo (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • His touch could be warm, deep, full, and broad in the fortes, and not hard even in the fortissimos; and his pianos, always of carrying power, could be as round and transparent as a dewdrop.
    • Very sensitive was his Verschwiegene Nachtigall and Ein Traum was truly a dream of a performance, with a good fortissimo that was only topped by the immense applause that accompanied the end of the first quarter.
    • The sudden fortissimo in the middle section is probably Janacek storming off in another of his enormous huffs.

Definition of fortissimo in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.