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furtive

Pronunciation: /ˈfɜːrtɪv; ˈfɜːtɪv/

Translation of furtive in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (stealthy) [movement/look] furtivo; [persona] solapado she stole a furtive glance at the clock miró disimuladamente el reloj
    Example sentences
    • For her part, Christine noticed the partially furtive glances, and it saddened her more than she would've cared to admit.
    • When their meal arrived, he forgot about them and did not notice the furtive glances the two reclusive men cast their way, although he glanced idly at them when they left the tavern.
    • Usually this would prompt me to snort: how about the homosexual church officials who preach this stuff in public while leading furtive double lives?
    1.2 (suspicious, shifty) [appearance] sospechoso; [manner] solapado
    Example sentences
    • The look the officer had given Ian had been furtive, almost guilty, and Ian sensed disapproval in the man's silence.
    • Arnold, even as he issues obligatory denials, is, unlike Bill, neither furtive nor guilty.
    • There was nothing furtive or nervous about him - it was as if he was perfectly entitled to be there.

Definition of furtive in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.