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gaslight

Pronunciation: /ˈgæslaɪt/

Translation of gaslight in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 countable/numerable (light fitting) lámpara (feminine) de gas
    Example sentences
    • Street gaslights add their glow to the swimming moonshine and are reflected in the siren's diamond coronet and huge dark eyes that know the secrets of the deep.
    • As paved roads, the telegraph, telephone lines, gaslights, and electric lines caused the city to change, so did the CPD.
    • In 1878, he established Edison Electric Light Company and announced plans to invent safe electric lights to take the place of Shanghai's dangerous gaslights.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable (illumination) luz (feminine) de gas to read by gaslight leer* a la luz de una lámpara de gas
    Example sentences
    • The same decade saw the foundation of the South Kensington Museum, endowed with an exemplary collection for craftsmen to learn from, and soon lit by gaslight in order to encourage working people to visit the collections in the evening.
    • ‘Van Gogh mentioned in his letters that his paintings looked different in daylight and gaslight,’ said Bluhm.
    • The first public gas company in the world was set up in London in 1812, and Westminster Bridge was the first public thoroughfare to be illuminated by gaslight.

Definition of gaslight in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.