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getaway

Pronunciation: /ˈgetəweɪ/

Translation of getaway in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (quick departure) huida (feminine), fuga (feminine) to make one's getaway escaparse, huir* the thieves made a quick getaway los ladrones se dieron rápidamente a la fuga or huyeron rápidamente del lugar de los hechos (before noun/delante del nombre) the getaway car el coche que usaron ( or iban a usar etc) para la fuga 1.2 (short vacation, break) (American English/inglés norteamericano) escapada (feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • The suspect ran off, chased by the shop's staff, but escaped in a getaway car driven by an accomplice waiting outside the store.
    • Although he escaped in a getaway car, he was pursued by police.
    • A bicycle thief made a quick getaway after stealing his set of wheels in broad daylight.
    Example sentences
    • Roads, ports and airports were today coping well with the wave of holidaymakers making Easter getaways.
    • This does not have to be a long vacation, just a weekend getaway.
    • This road is not spared even on holidays or weekends as it is the gateway to weekend getaways in that part of the city.
    Example sentences
    • Both children and parents alike are happier getting whisked off to summer camps and holiday getaways, far from the cramped confines of the city.
    • Adding a few tropical plants in containers can give you the fragrance and color of an island getaway in the smallest space.
    • Suitable as either a permanent country home or a holiday getaway, this roadside holding goes under the hammer on July 24.
    1.3 (in race) (American English/inglés norteamericano) salida (feminine), arranque (masculine)

Definition of getaway in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales