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giddy

Pronunciation: /ˈgɪdi/

Translation of giddy in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-dier, -diest)

  • 1 1.1 [feeling/sensation] de mareo or aturdimiento he felt giddy se sentía mareado, la cabeza le daba vueltas don't look down, it'll make you giddy no mires hacia abajo que te va a dar vértigo all this talk is making me giddy tanta charla me está confundiendo
    Example sentences
    • She was giddy with delight and has now fallen head over heels for his feline charms.
    • It's a mildly light-headed, giddy sensation that starts in the chest and spreads out through the body and along the limbs.
    • They are giddy with jetlag and an unspecified number of rum swizzles (an evening ritual).
    1.2 (causing dizziness) [speed] vertiginoso eventually I reached the giddy heights of supervisor [ironic] finalmente me vi encumbrado al puesto de supervisor [irónico]
  • 2 (silly) [person] atolondrado, tarambana, alocado oh, my giddy aunt! (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] [dated/anticuado] ¡Ángela María! [colloquial/familiar] [anticuado]
    Example sentences
    • I'm giddy as a young girl in a field, and a little anxious.
    • Just as Christy was replacing the phone on the base, Carmen came tearing into the room, giddy as a young schoolgirl, and grabbed Christy's hand.
    • Queen Rosalind peered across the distance of the causeway towards the horizon with the giddy enthusiasm of a young maid about to receive a precious, long anticipated, gift.

Definition of giddy in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.