Translation of glider in Spanish:

glider

Pronunciation: /ˈglaɪdər; ˈglaɪdə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1 [Aviation/Aviación] 1.1 (plane) planeador (masculine) (before noun/delante del nombre) glider pilot piloto (masculine and feminine) de planeador
    More example sentences
    • While most gliders are towed, then released, by a powered aircraft, some gliders are equipped with engine power to reach their target altitude.
    • Prior to this time, he had been concerned with gliders and fixed-wing aircraft and, in 1918, designed a tri-motor bomber for the Spanish Air Force.
    • Using gliders, helicopters, remote-controlled models, micro-light aircraft and balloons the filmmakers were able to get the stunning footage.
    1.2 (person) piloto (masculine and feminine) de vuelo sin motor
    More example sentences
    • Like more familiar gliders, such as flying squirrels, flying snakes are not actually able to fly upward.
    • And like flying squirrels, these anomalurids are accomplished gliders, leaping from the tops of trees and capable of agile bends and changes of direction.
    • That principle is also at work in the spread between the feathers on the wing tips of the best low-speed gliders, such as vultures and hawks.
  • 2 (swinging seat) (American English/inglés norteamericano) mecedora (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • She flopped back down into the glider, setting it swinging wildly for a moment.
    • Music leaked softly from the windows behind him, when he'd resumed his seat on the glider.
    • He sat back down on the porch glider, and continued with his widdle work.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.