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globe

Pronunciation: /gləʊb/

Translation of globe in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 (world) the globe el globo
    Example sentences
    • ‘It is a window to find new places and to tell readers around the globe about the world, its culture, its science and its nature,’ he said at the launch.
    • Owing to the advances in the growing field of information technology, colleges and universities around the globe have begun offering Internet-based courses.
    • Millions are used in factories, hospitals, universities around the globe for radiology, calibrating instruments and research.
    1.2 (model) globo (masculine) terráqueo
    Example sentences
    • The goal was to see if they could take the globe's touch-sensitive surface and apply it to paper.
    • I rationalized this time span by calculating the surface area of the globe: 21 square feet.
    • The pin, which was small and had no legible writing, most obviously contained a two-dimensionable representation of the globe, with an eagle above it.
  • 2 (lampshade) globo (masculine); (goldfish bowl) pecera (feminine) ([ esférica ])
    Example sentences
    • It's even less traditional up the stairwells where giant alien globes have landed, masquerading as light fittings.
    • The massive ship's boilers were easily recognised, piercing the gloom like giant globes.
    • The fruit and veg stalls were amazing, piled high with fantastic looking produce, plum tomatoes, giant mangos, mountains of artichoke globes, cauliflowers bigger than footballs.

Definition of globe in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales