There are 2 translations of goad in Spanish:

goad1

Pronunciation: /gəʊd/

vt

  • [person] acosar; [animal] aguijonearto goad sb into sth/-ing they tried to goad her into an argument la provocaron para que empezara a discutir she was goaded into doing it tanto la acosaron, que lo hizo
    More example sentences
    • But in any issue, we should be prepared to think carefully, and not let our reaction to extremists goad us into overlooking any Biblical principles that apply.
    • When I used to meet him regularly outside the Brompton Oratory after his Sunday devotions, it took little prompting to goad him into a diatribe against his latest enemy.
    • I didn't realise that people would attempt to goad us into aggression at regular intervals.

Phrasal verbs

goad on

verb + object + adverb/verbo + complemento + adverbio
(incite) empujar, incitar

Definition of goad in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of goad in Spanish:

goad2

n

  • [Agriculture/Agricultura] aguijada (f), picana (f) (Latin America/América Latina) ; (for elephants) focino (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The Ripon report suggests widespread use of sticks and electric goads, and says that some animals had to be dragged into and out of trucks and lorries.
    • These sort of things scare the cattle, and then you have to like do a lot of rough handling to get them to go by there, like a wad of electric goads.
    • The spurs on the legs were goads; knee goads, ankle goads, and foot goads.

Definition of goad in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.