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goofy
American English: /ˈɡufi/
British English: /ˈɡuːfi/

Translation of goofy in Spanish:

adjective -fier, -fiest

[slang]
  • 1 (American English) 1.1 (stupid)
    Example sentences
    • His strange mannerisms and goofy asides are amusing, and he has a comedian's sensibility for wanting to keep the audience at home interested.
    • Funny links to goofy stories seem to be included now only to relieve the tension.
    • In fact, it seems a little rushed at first, but the time is well saved when we start to meet all the characters, and trot alongside this gentle love story full of poignant moments and goofy funny bits.
    Example sentences
    • June's picture was of several patients in a secure facility sitting with goofy grins in front of a television displaying a test pattern.
    • Audiences leap to their feet, they cheer, they sing, they stick on goofy ear-to-ear grins, and they all know they are privileged to be in the presence of greatness.
    • Brian threw the magazine in its brown paper bag, sideways like a Frisbee, to this other kid called Matt, who had goofy teeth and awful acne.
    1.2 (stupefied)
  • 2
    (British English)
    de conejo [colloquial]

Definition of goofy in:

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    Word of the day haughty
    Pronunciation: ˈhɔːti
    adjective
    arrogantly superior and disdainful
    Cultural fact of the day

    Carnaval

    Carnaval is the three days of festivities preceding Lent, characterized by costumes, masks, drinking, music, and dancing. Spain's most colorful carnival is in Santa Cruz, Tenerife, and Cadiz's carnival is also famous. In Spanish-speaking Latin America, the carnivals of Uruguay, Bolivia, and Venezuela are very well known.