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grim

Pronunciation: /grɪm/

Translation of grim in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-mm-)

  • 1.1 (stern) [person/expression] adusto 1.2 (gloomy) [outlook/situation] nefasto, desalentador; [landscape] sombrío, lúgubre; [weather] deprimente; [truth] crudo these are grim times for industry corren tiempos muy negros para la industria the grim reality la cruda or dura realidad
    Example sentences
    • But she could see everyone else paying close attention, their expressions slowly becoming more serious and grim.
    • She looked up to see his grim expression and immediately sobered.
    • This time, none of them were laughing; they looked grim and serious.
    1.3 (unyielding) [struggle] denodado she carried on with grim determination siguió adelante, resuelta a no dejarse vencer with a grim smile sonriendo a pesar de todo
    Example sentences
    • Rural life is shown as harsh and grim where the ablest and younger peasants sought to escape to the factories in the cities.
    • The lives of agricultural and urban workers would have been just as grim.
    • Others are angry but matter-of-fact about a lifestyle that seems unbearably grim to the outsider.
    1.4 (sinister) [tale/joke] macabro
    Example sentences
    • With these grim figures to consider, it is expected that Carlow would be one of the first test centres in the country to benefit from any forthcoming additional resources.
    • The alternative - settling for economic, cultural and demographic stagnation - is too grim to consider.
    • This could be grim news for millions of consumers whose life savings are invested in pensions, endowments and other savings contracts.
    Example sentences
    • Most of us use grim humour to cope with life's dark side.
    • Sitting in the shade of the fig trees in Westminster's bustling Portcullis House last week, Ian Cawsey recalled with grim humour the moment when he almost died.
    • But somehow, that sort of irreverent, grim humor doesn't seem appropriate.
    1.5 (below par) [colloquial/familiar] [performance] penoso, desastroso I feel pretty grim me siento or me encuentro fatal [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • The rear of Selfridges is a grim place, just a service road lined by characterless buildings, and totally unlike the elegance of the imposing frontage.
    • They live in a house in the most unpromising of territory - a grim estate on the Charlton-Woolwich boundary - yet the interior of their home is fantastic.
    • Ever wondered how the NHS struggles by in the grotty, run-down and ultimately grim areas of this country?

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Cultural fact of the day

In Mexican politics, a prospective party candidate for the presidency is called a tapado. Candidates traditionally emerge from within the party but their identity is not revealed until the candidate is officially declared: they remain tapados (hidden), thus arousing a great deal of speculation. Under the rule of the PRI - Partido Revolucionario Institucional, its candidate was virtually guaranteed to become president.