Translation of guts in Spanish:

guts

Pronunciation: /gʌts/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (+ plural verb/+ verbo en plural) [colloquial/familiar] 1.1 (bowels) tripas (feminine plural) [colloquial/familiar] to cough one's guts up reventarse* tosiendo to hate sb's guts no poder* ver a algn, odiar a algn a muerte they hate each other's guts no se pueden ver, se odian a muerte to have sb's guts for garters (British English/inglés británico) romperle* la cabeza or las costillas a algn, sacarle* las tripas a algn [colloquial/familiar] to spill your guts [colloquial/familiar] contar* la vida y milagros she spilled her guts to a journalist [colloquial/familiar] le contó su vida y milagros a un periodista to work o slog one's guts out echar los bofes [colloquial/familiar], deslomarse (trabajando) [colloquial/familiar] 1.2 (internal mechanism) tripas (feminine plural) [colloquial/familiar]
  • 2 (+ singular or plural verb/+ verbo en singular o plural) (courage) [colloquial/familiar] agallas (feminine plural) [colloquial/familiar] it takes guts hay que tener agallas [colloquial/familiar] they've got guts tienen agallas
  • 3 (glutton) [colloquial/familiar] [pejorative/peyorativo] tragón, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar], glotón, (masculine, feminine), angurriento, (masculine, feminine) (Southern Cone/Cono Sur)

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.