There are 2 translations of hang up in Spanish:

hang up

  • 1verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio 1.1 (put down receiver) colgar*, cortar (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) to hang up on sb colgarle* or (in Southern Cone also/en Cono Sur también) cortarle a algn she hung up on me me colgó or (in Southern Cone also/en Cono Sur también) me cortó 1.2 [Computing/Informática] desconectarse
  • 2verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento (on hook, hanger) [coat] colgar* to hang up one's boots o (in American English also/en inglés norteamericano también) spikes/sneakers/skates retirarse
See parent entry: hang

Definition of hang up in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of hang up in Spanish:

hang-up

Pronunciation: /ˈhæŋʌp/

n

  • [colloquial/familiar] complejo (m), trauma (m) she has so many hang-ups tiene tantos complejos or traumas
    More example sentences
    • Maybe they have fascinatingly complex emotional hang-ups just waiting to be mined by pop psychology - and maybe it's none of our business.
    • I also suffer from the narcissistic delusion that my hang-ups are so uniquely complex that no therapist could possibly know how to deal with me.
    • Abstinence allows the cravings to subside and the mind to clear, leaving the individual free to deal with emotional hang-ups.

Definition of hang up in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.