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hare
American English: /hɛr/
British English: /hɛː/

Translation of hare in Spanish:

noun

  • (as) mad as a March hare
    más loco que una cabra
    to raise o start a hare (British English)
    irse por las ramas
    to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds (British English)
    servir a Dios y al diablo
    Example sentences
    • European game animals include various deer, wild boar, hare, and rabbit.
    • Three species of hares are native to California, the snowshoe, black-tailed, and white-tailed.
    • He said: ‘I've noticed an increase in birds and a lot more hares since the grassland has been in place.’

intransitive verb

  • (British English) [colloquial]to hare in/out/up/down
    entrar/salir/subir/bajar a la carrera or como un bólido [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • Mutu leaves Toure for dead, hares down the left wing and shoots from a narrow angle.
    • Then Harry came haring out of the bathroom like some over-protective mother bear and just about bit my head off.
    • He has already been haring about this morning, giving awards to schoolchildren and meeting with constituents.

Definition of hare in:

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