There are 2 translations of harm in Spanish:

harm1

Pronunciation: /hɑːrm; hɑːm/

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • daño (masculine) to do harm hacer* daño the harm's already been done el daño ya está hecho warning her can't do any harm una advertencia no le vendrá mal or no le hará daño to do more harm than good hacer* más mal or daño que bien don't worry, there's no harm done no se preocupe, no es nada to do harm to sb/sth hacerle* daño a algn/algo there's no harm in trying/asking con probar/preguntar no se pierde nada I can't see any harm in that no veo que eso tenga nada de malo where's/what's the harm in that? ¿y qué tiene (eso) de malo? not to come to any harm/to come to no harm he'll come to no harm, no harm will come to him, he won't come to any harm no le va a pasar nada I didn't mean him any harm no quería hacerle daño I meant no harm by that remark no lo dije con mala intención out of harm's way a salvo let's get the children out of harm's way quitemos a los niños de en medio keep o stay out of harm's way until we've swept up the broken glass no se acerquen hasta que hayamos barrido los vidrios or (Spain/España) cristales rotos
    More example sentences
    • They knew that there was a very strong chance that the police would come in and remove them and, in that process, inflict physical injury or serious harm to a person.
    • Police officers then arrived and arrested the offender, 19, on suspicion of causing actual body harm.
    • Emphasize the importance of telling you and an adult at school whenever another kid or group of kids causes your child or anyone else physical harm.

Definition of harm in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of harm in Spanish:

harm2

vt

  • [person/object] hacerle* daño a; [reputation/career] perjudicar* it won't harm you to get up early for once no te va a hacer daño or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) a hacer mal levantarte temprano una vez
    More example sentences
    • Despite all these, if I ever hear again about you physically harming others, don't be surprised if the police come and arrest you for assault.
    • This taxi driver became violent and physically harmed me.
    • There is no use fighting intolerance by physically harming someone.
    More example sentences
    • Some workers who claim that their health has been harmed by tobacco smoke at work, are already suing employers for damages of up to 250,000.
    • ‘I know I am harming my health, but there are so many people smoking around me, so the harm must be slight,’ said the boy while blowing out smoke.
    • Environmentalists claim the waves were harming the health of local residents.
    More example sentences
    • Do we feed the hungry by developing higher-yielding crops, even if it might harm the Earth?
    • Taking five or eight or ten years off to get the kids started off right before they go to school is going to mean irreparably harming our prospects for advancement.
    • Cunningham is popular with the party faithful, but party modernisers view her as too radical and fear that some of her views could be harming their electoral prospects.

Definition of harm in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.