There are 2 translations of heap in Spanish:

heap1

Pronunciation: /hiːp/

n

  • 2 [colloquial/familiar] 2.1 (a lot) heaps o (AmE also) a heap of sth montones or un montón de algo [familiar/colloquial], pilas de algo (AmS) [familiar/colloquial] 2.2 (as intensifier) it's heaps o (AmE) a heap better/bigger es muchísimo mejor/más grande or [familiar/colloquial] requetemejor/requetemás grande

More definitions of heap

Definition of heap in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of heap in Spanish:

heap2

vt

  • 1.1 (make pile) amontonar 1.2 (supply liberally) she heaped food onto his plate oheaped his plate with food le llenó el plato de comida awards and recognition were heaped upon her recibió multitud de galardones to heap praise on sb colmar a algn de alabanzas to heap blame on sb echarle todas las culpas a algn 1.3
    (heaping pres p)
    (AmE) [Culin] colmado
    1.4
    (heaped past p)
    (BrE) [Culin] colmado

Phrasal verbs

heap up

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
1.1 (amass) [wealth/riches] acumular, amasar you're only heaping up problems for yourself lo que estás haciendo es buscarte un montón de problemas 1.2 (make into pile) amontonar, apilar

More definitions of heap

Definition of heap in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.