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hitch

Pronunciation: /hɪtʃ/

Translation of hitch in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 3 (knot) nudo (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Lash ropes and diamond hitches are untied, the horses unpacked and then hobbled or tethered in the meadow below camp.
    • Also available is The Klutz Book of Knots, a step-by-step manual on how to tie the world's 24 most useful hitches, ties, warps and knots.
  • 4 (ride) [colloquial/familiar] we got a hitch to Dover nos llevaron hasta Dover, nos dieron (un) aventón hasta Dover (Colombia) (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • For all its water-tightness and lack of style, all the stuff I tried to read, passed through MSOffice grammar check without a hitch!
    • It wasn't easy to do, but English class finally started without a hitch and my headache remained in the back corner of my mind.
    • Luckily, the surgery was completed without a hitch and the patient was informed of the problem.
    Example sentences
    • The Admiral recruited me after I had served a hitch in the Navy.
    • Americans in uniform, whether they serve for one hitch or an entire career, are taught to view themselves as professionals.
    • On the troop ship home were a bunch of criminals - American soldiers who had spent most of their hitch in the brig.
  • 5 (period of service) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar] he did a three-year hitch in the navy pasó tres años enganchado en la marina [colloquial/familiar]
  • 6 (fastening device) enganche (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • These pieces of equipment can be easily attached to a trailer hitch and taken from a job site.
    • Some rear bumpers may come with a built-in step or a trailer hitch that will add more functionality to your Chevrolet pickup or SUV.
    • Headlights, brush guard and trailer hitch without ball are standard features.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 (attach) to hitch sth to sth enganchar algo a algo to get hitched [colloquial/familiar] casarse, matrimoniarse [colloquial/familiar] [humorous/humorístico]
  • 2 (move) he hitched his chair nearer to the fire acercó or arrimó su silla al fuego
  • 3 (thumb) [colloquial/familiar] to hitch a ride o (in British English also/en inglés británico también) a lift hacer* dedo [colloquial/familiar], hacer* autostop, ir* de aventón (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar], pedir* cola (Venezuela) [colloquial/familiar] he hitched a ride on a truck lo recogió or le paró un camión I hitched my way to Paris fui a París a dedo or (Mexico/México) de aventón or (Venezuela) en cola [colloquial/familiar]

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

Phrasal verbs

hitch up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 1.1 (pull up) [trousers/petticoat/shirt] remangarse*, subirse, levantarse 1.2 (attach) [horses/cart] enganchar 1.1verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (move up) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], correrse hitch up a bit and make room for me córrete un poquito para hacerme un lugar

Definition of hitch in:

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Word of the day tecito
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Cultural fact of the day

The current Spanish Constitution (Constitución Española) was approved in the Cortes Generales in December 1978. It describes Spain as a parliamentary monarchy, gives sovereign power to the people through universal suffrage, recognizes the plurality of religions, and transfers responsibility for defense from the armed forces to the government. The Constitution was generally well received, except in the Basque Country, whose desire for independence it did not satisfy. It is considered to have facilitated the successful transition from dictatorship to democracy.