There are 2 translations of hole in Spanish:

hole1

Pronunciation: /həʊl/

n

  • 1 1.1 (in belt, material, clothing) agujero (m); (in ground) hoyo (m), agujero (m); (in road) bache (m); (in wall) boquete (m); (in defenses) brecha (f) my socks are in holes tengo los calcetines llenos de agujeros to make a hole in sth hacer* un agujero en algo, agujerear algo that made a hole in their savings eso se llevó or se comió buena parte de sus ahorros in the hole (American English/inglés norteamericano) we're $10,000 in the hole to the bank le debemos 10.000 dólares al banco I'm just going deeper and deeper in the hole cada vez estoy más endeudado or más cargado de deudas money just burns a hole in his/her pocket el dinero le quema las manos to need sth like a hole in the head I need a visit from him like I need a hole in the head ¡lo único que me faltaba! ¡que él viniera a verme!
    More example sentences
    • Transplant the seedlings in the normal manner by making a small hole through the surface mulch/manure and plant them into it.
    • Jay mounded flour, made a hole in it, and dumped in a pinch of salt and then an egg.
    • He's been out in the car park for the last couple of weeks, digging a big hole in the ground.
    More example sentences
    • Take a large sewing needle to puncture evenly spaced holes around the top and bottom of the shade.
    • We worked along the steel wall passing large circular holes where the heavy brass portholes had once been.
    • The roof is leaking, there are holes in the floor, the sewage pipes are broken, the heating doesn't work - there is no money in the kitty.
    More example sentences
    • Good on the surface, but as many have pointed out, all the plot holes and problems show up when you think about it for more than 10 seconds.
    • One insider said the reason for the explosion of counterfeiting was the hole still existing in the law.
    • Within 24 hr of the announcement, wily business pilots had figured out the plan was full of holes.
    1.2 (in argument, proposal) punto (masculine) débil to pick holes in sth encontrarle* defectos or faltas a algo he picked holes in their plan/theory le encontró defectos a su plan/teoría 1.3 (of animal) madriguera (feminine) mouse hole ratonera (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • While walking this earth he commented that foxes had holes and birds had nests in which to live, but he had ‘nowhere to lay his head’.
    • Hounds that have successfully tracked a fox are trained to pull it or dig it out of its hole, and the fox is killed.
    • From holes, burrows, and crevices, the creatures of the desert night crawled.
  • 2 [Sport/Deporte] 2.1 (in golf) hoyo (masculine) to play nine/eighteen holes jugar* (un partido) a nueve/dieciocho hoyos 2.2 (in US football) hueco (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Steve Ryser and Mike Franklin sunk a long putt each on holes nine and eighteen respectively.
    • Lytham is a classic seaside links, nine flattish holes out, nine flattish holes in.
    • This usually occurs on short putts as golfers try to steer the ball toward the hole.
  • 3 3.1 (unpleasant place) [colloquial/familiar] this town is a real hole! ¡qué pueblo de mala muerte! [colloquial/familiar] his room was a dirty hole su cuarto era un cuchitril inmundo 3.2 (awkward situation) [colloquial/familiar] to be in a hole estar* en un apuro or aprieto to get sb out of a hole sacar* a algn de un apuro or aprieto
    More example sentences
    • Her sudden idea to bring Ryan with her, to the hole of a town she originated from, had not been discussed with him.
    • Students were aggrieved at the possibility of being ‘stuck renting a hole in Cowley’ as Jessop put it.
    • Four more fights in this hole before we get the hell out of here.
    More example sentences
    • The stage was huge - the World Cup - his team was in a hole, and the situation was certainly death or glory.
    • The criticism of the state companies has surfaced at a time when they appear to be climbing out of the financial holes into which they stumbled in the 1990s.
    • It took us 20 years to get in this hole and it's going to take us 20 years to get out.

Definition of hole in:

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Word of the day constipado
adj
está muy constipado = he has a bad cold …
Cultural fact of the day

The Senado is the name of the upper chamber of the Spanish Cortes Generales, and the place where it meets. There are 250 senators, most of whom are elected every four years, at general elections, four from each province. A small number of senators are also elected by the autonomous governments. The Senado's functions include discussing, approving, and suggesting amendments to legislation passed by the Congreso de los Diputados and supervising the compensation fund for the autonomous regions.

There are 2 translations of hole in Spanish:

hole2

vt

  • 1 (in golf) [ball] embocar*; [putt/shot] transformar he holed the 15th in four hizo el hoyo 15 en cuatro golpes
    More example sentences
    • Magnificently, he holed the shot and allowed himself to smile again.
    • I'm swinging the club the way I want to, the putter is okay too, it's just that I'm holing nothing.
    • I wasn't at the green when he holed the putt and punched the air four or five times, but it remains one of my strongest memories, even now.
  • 2 [ship] abrir* una brecha en
    More example sentences
    • Two days later it was holed and drifting landwards with oil gushing out of its tanks.
    • Casualties were light but they lost one of their ships when it hit a rock and was holed.
    • The vessel was holed in numerous tanks with loss of crude and resultant pollution.

vi

  • (in golf) to hole in one embocar* en un golpe, hacer* un hoyo en un golpe

Phrasal verbs

hole out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio

hole up

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
[colloquial/familiar] esconderse, refugiarse they spent the winter holed up in a seedy hotel pasaron el invierno escondidos en un hotel de mala muerte

Definition of hole in:

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Word of the day constipado
adj
está muy constipado = he has a bad cold …
Cultural fact of the day

The Senado is the name of the upper chamber of the Spanish Cortes Generales, and the place where it meets. There are 250 senators, most of whom are elected every four years, at general elections, four from each province. A small number of senators are also elected by the autonomous governments. The Senado's functions include discussing, approving, and suggesting amendments to legislation passed by the Congreso de los Diputados and supervising the compensation fund for the autonomous regions.