Translation of homicide in Spanish:

homicide

Pronunciation: /ˈhɑːməsaɪd; ˈhɒmɪsaɪd/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 u and c (crime, act) homicidio (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [investigation] de un homicidio; [trial] por homicidio
    More example sentences
    • The principal felonies were homicide, rape, theft, burglary, robbery and arson.
    • He was charged with criminal homicide and is lodged in the county prison.
    • Men, on the other hand, had been sentenced to prison primarily for serious assault, drugs, homicide, and robbery.
    1.2 countable/numerable (murderer) [formal] homicida (masculine and feminine)
    More example sentences
    • An extraordinary 40 per cent of homicides cannot remember the moment of murder.
    1.3 uncountable/no numerable (police squad) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], homicidios (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Det Supt Andy Brennan, of West Yorkshire Police's Homicide and Major Enquiry Team, said the woman's injuries included a number of bruises to her body, and marks around her neck.
    • Operation Recall, led by West Yorkshire Police's newly formed Homicide and Major Enquiry Team, has already resulted in two men being charged.
    • One of the five detained during the weekend was held in St Vincent on Friday by two local policemen, one from Homicide, the other a detective.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.