Translation of honestly in Spanish:

honestly

Pronunciation: /ˈɑːnəstli; ˈɒnɪstli/

adverb/adverbio

  • 1.1 (sincerely) [answer/say/think] sinceramente, francamente I can honestly say (that) … puedo decir con toda sinceridad que … I don't know and I honestly don't care no lo sé y la verdad es que no me importa
    More example sentences
    • I sincerely and honestly regret everything that happened.
    • I found the images truly sickening and I honestly could not believe that you would decide to publish them.
    • I honestly believe that it wasn't just an attack on America, although it happened here in America.
    1.2 (sentence adv) en serio, de verdad I don't mind, honestly en serio or de verdad (que) no me importa 1.3 (as interjection/como interjección) (expressing exasperation) ¡por favor! oh, honestly! let me do it! ¡por favor! anda, deja que lo hago yo
    More example sentences
    • Oh, honestly! Could my day possibly be more boring?
    • Oh honestly, was that really necessary?
    • Honestly, did you have to tell everyone?
    1.4 (legitimately) [act/earn] con honradez, honradamente
    More example sentences
    • Would you trust this man to behave fairly, honestly, and ethically in his portfolio?
    • He had reached a wrong conclusion, but there was every indication that he had come to this decision honestly and honourably.
    • We would do better to deal honestly with what they have shown us than to criticize them for speaking the truth without love.

Definition of honestly in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.