Share this entry

Share this page

hot

Pronunciation: /hɑːt; hɒt/

Translation of hot in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-tt-)

  • 1 1.1 [food/water] caliente; [weather/day] caluroso; [climate] cálido a hot country un país caluroso don't touch it, it's hot no lo toques, está caliente it's hot today/in here hoy/aquí hace calor I'm/he's hot tengo/tiene calor to get hot [oven/iron/radiator] calentarse* I/she got very hot me/le dio mucho calor am I getting hot? (in children's games) ¿caliente o frío? the metal was red hot el metal estaba al rojo vivo under the hot sun al rayo del sol to get/be all hot and bothered about sth (British English/inglés británico) sulfurarse/estar* sulfurado por algo to go hot and cold all over I went hot and cold all over se me puso la carne de gallina, me dieron escalofríos to have a hot temper tener* mal genio, tener* un carácter explosivo blow1 2 1 1
    Example sentences
    • The sea water temperature is a warm 37 degrees - hot enough for a bath!
    • The summer months are hot with daytime temperatures in the low to mid 90's, but the winters are mild.
    • The time to start this project is when the weather is sunny and hot - 80 degrees or more.
    Example sentences
    • An hour later the three were chatting over hot chocolate in the small cafe that served hot drinks and food to skaters.
    • It was perhaps the quickest I had ever prepared a hot drink, and it was in under a minute.
    • A simple meal of soup, bread and cheese, followed by a hot drink, is served and a basket is available for voluntary donations as you leave.
    1.2 (spicy) [curry/sauce] picante, picoso (Mexico/México)
    Example sentences
    • I think it has a lot more kick and tastes even better with hot cherry peppers instead.
    • The flavour of garlic is well known for its hot, dry pungent taste, savoured in the cuisine of many cultures.
    • When we do see him eat out it is often at a Mexican take-out, where quantities of hot sauce disguise the taste.
  • 2 2.1 (intense) [contest] muy reñido there is hot speculation about the outcome se está especulando mucho acerca del resultado things started getting hot on lap 25 la cosa se empezó a animar en la vuelta número 25 [colloquial/familiar] 2.2 (dangerous) [colloquial/familiar] peligroso to make things hot for sb hacerle* la vida muy difícil a algn the situation was too hot to handle la situación entrañaba demasiados riesgos or era demasiado comprometedora
    Example sentences
    • So, anyway, I can exclusively report my hot surf fashion tips.
    • The only way I know what TV shows are currently hot is by reading about them in magazines and such.
    • In 12 months' time, the event will be staged again, and four more hopefuls will vie for the title of hot new fashion star.
    Example sentences
    • Unfortunately, unlike cutting taxes, cutting spending is a task that even the most fearless of politicians usually finds too hot to handle.
    • McCusker, Gray, and McEvoy were proving too hot to handle, Derry found fouling the only way to stop them.
    • Australia found the target of six runs an over too hot to handle, slipping from 102 for one to 136 for seven in less than nine overs.
    2.3 (eager) [colloquial/familiar]hot for sth a public hot for the latest novelty un público ávido de novedades he was hot on o for her estaba loco por ella [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • All I felt was frustration and anger and hot emotions roiling through me.
    • His eyes were wide, and Egewe sensed the hot miasma of emotions that the boy was emitting.
  • 3 3.1 (fresh) [news/scent] reciente, fresco news hot off the press una noticia de último momento 3.2 (current) [story/issue] de plena actualidad
    Example sentences
    • These used to be the sites of hot political and literary debate.
    • Both were criminally charged amid hot debate over whether the female officer should be punished in such a situation.
    • But of late the hot debate is why many women are choosing not to marry and others are opting for the union later in life.
    3.3 (popular, in demand) [product] de gran aceptación; [play/movie] taquillero one of Hollywood's hottest stars una de las estrellas más cotizadas de Hollywood
    Example sentences
    • It is pretty uneventful except for introducing the new characters - Rachel and her dad, Alex, who is hot for Susan.
    • Lehman also points out a bit of censorship when one line proved too hot for the dialogue track, though it's there for lip-readers.
    • The truth is, even if they were dog-ugly I'd still be kind of hot for them.
    Example sentences
    • The stories were hot topics for major news outlets and bloggers, due to the companies involved and the massive number of compromised records.
    • Brunswick omits any reference to the date of the event so that it's unclear his story is not exactly hot news.
    • Outsourcing may be a hot topic in the news, but the practice is as old as computers themselves.
    Example sentences
    • In a moment they raised a loud clamor, announcing that the scent was hot.
    • Once picking up hot scent, he bores in and busts birds out of the cover to provide the gun a shot.
  • 4 [colloquial/familiar] 4.1 (expert) [card-player/lawyer] hábilto be hot at/on sth she's pretty hot at physics es un hacha or es muy buena en física he's pretty hot on current affairs está muy al tanto en temas de actualidad I'm not too hot on the subject no sé mucho del tema 4.2 (keen)to be hot on sth she's hot on punctuality le da mucha importancia a la puntualidad 4.3 (satisfactory) (pred, with neg) how are things? — not so hot ¿qué tal? — regular or más o menos she's not feeling too hot no se encuentra muy bien
    Example sentences
    • And while iMode may be fine for targeting kids and consumers, it's not so hot for business.
    • I'm not too hot with electronics, so I managed to enlist my brother to sort the circuits out for me.
    • Its demeanour is that of the same old story as they have once again failed to exceed their own limitations, making it a must for fans but not so hot for the rest of us.
    4.4 [colloquial/familiar] (sexually attractive) buenón [colloquial/familiar] a hot chick una chica buenona, un cuero (Chile) (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar], una mina rica (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) [colloquial/familiar] he's really hot es muy buenón, está buenísimo, está cuerísimo (Mexico/México) es minísimo (Chile)
    Example sentences
    • But then our Johann isn't so hot on the maths, even at the best of times.
    • The purveyor of fine art, who also makes an honest buck with cartoons and wacky drawings, is hot on humour.
    • They're great at scaring us with how much we pay into Europe, not so hot on telling us what we get out of it.
  • 5 (stolen) [slang/argot] robado, afanado [slang/argot], mangado [slang/argot]
    Example sentences
    • It is so hot and radioactive that the miners use remote control equipment.
    Example sentences
    • The situation goes from bad to worse after they find a way to dispose of the hot merchandise.
    • In those first vital hours, the police decided to publicise the raid as much as possible in a bid to make the stolen pictures too hot to handle.
    • Police decided to publicise the robbery as much as possible in an effort to make the paintings too hot to handle.
  • 6 (in gambling) the hot favorite el gran favorito a hot tip un soplo
  • 7 (radioactive) [slang/argot] [debris/waste] radiactivo

Phrasal verbs

hot up

(-tt-)
(especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar]
verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (become more vigorous) [competition/battle] ponerse* reñido; [pace] acelerarse; [party] animarse 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento (make more vigorous) intensificar* the police are hotting up their search la policía está intensificando la búsqueda

Definition of hot in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day echado
adj
está echado porque no se encuentra bien = he's lying down because he doesn't feel well …
Cultural fact of the day

The Premios Goya del cine español is the Spanish equivalent of Oscars, awarded in January every year by the AACC (Academia de las Artes y las Ciencias Cinematográficas de España). The winners receive a bust of the painter Goya.