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hysterical

Pronunciation: /hɪˈsterɪkəl/

Translation of hysterical in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [Psychology/Psicología] histérico
    Example sentences
    • And as he watched her in confusion, Shelley's chuckle turned into an uncontrollable, hysterical fit of laughter.
    • Approach this end room and the first thing noticed will be the hysterical, uncontrollable laughter.
    • The young woman had crying fits, which were interspersed with screams and bursts of hysterical laughter.
    Example sentences
    • So I may be a cynical, hysterical, psychotic, twisted masochist.
    • Such a figure is literally and etymologically hysterical, as it is excessively feminized; it is also psychoanalytically hysterical.
    • Although Halle is not around to encounter Beloved, he too suffers trauma and exhibits hysterical symptoms.
    1.2 (uncontrolled) [fans/crowd] histérico he had a hysterical outburst le dio un ataque de histeria, se puso histérico she broke into a fit of hysterical laughter empezó a reírse histéricamente 1.3 (very funny) [colloquial/familiar] para morirse or desternillarse de (la) risa, tronchante (Spain/España) [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • How did this role come to you, this very funny, hysterical gun moll role?
    • For the show, a group of puppeteers steps in and performs these calls with some very funny looking puppets on hysterical sets.
    • Extreme gore and hysterical pratfalls all combine in a truly memorable mix.

Definition of hysterical in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales