Translation of illustrate in Spanish:

illustrate

Pronunciation: /ˈɪləstreɪt/

vt

  • 1 1.1 [book/story/magazine] ilustrar
    More example sentences
    • To illustrate the Book of Ruth, Merian chose to represent Boaz and Ruth at the threshing floor.
    • Photographic picture books, illustrating New York and other subjects, proliferated; a number of these featured the work of the new documentary photographers.
    • John Hodgkiss edited the diverse selection of reportage and portrait photographs illustrating the book.
    1.2
    (illustrated past participle of/participio pasado de)
    [book/edition] ilustrado; [lecture] ilustrado con diapositivas ( or proyecciones etc) lavishly illustrated profusamente ilustrado
    More example sentences
    • When Touch of Evil was first announced, a documentary explaining and illustrating the changes that resulted from Welles' memo was to have been included with the DVD.
    • One or two things seem to me underplayed (the great baroque invention of the Duet, for example), but thought has gone into explaining and illustrating most genres.
    • So let's look at another example as we explain and illustrate the general method.
  • 2 2.1 (explain by examples) ilustrar this example illustrates how serious the problem is este ejemplo ilustra la gravedad del problema 2.2 (show) poner* de manifiesto, demostrar*
    More example sentences
    • One example will serve to illustrate how comprehensive and penetrating his discernment is.
    • Three examples can serve to illustrate how a choice of ruler was made and the thinking behind the resources made available to him.
    • Clearly, this is a grossly simplified example but it serves to illustrate how such a solution is very open to sabotage.

vi

Definition of illustrate in:

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Word of the day torta
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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.