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impersonal

Pronunciation: /ɪmˈpɜːrsnəl; ɪmˈpɜːsənl/

Translation of impersonal in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [atmosphere/building/manner] impersonal
    Example sentences
    • The subject matter may be impersonal and unemotional but it doesn't make it any more enjoyable to know that.
    • It might suggest a curt, efficient, formal, impersonal, or even angry attitude about the conversation.
    • But a book is always an extension of its author, however impersonal the subject matter.
    Example sentences
    • But online stores are cold, impersonal places devoid of any sense of human contact, where every book is merely an itemised commodity.
    • At the time, however, my dad deplored the feeling that he was becoming just another number in an impersonal organization, a cog in the machine.
    • You may have a tendency to avoid gyms because you think of them as unattractive, boring or impersonal places.
    1.2 [Linguistics/Lingüística] impersonal
    Example sentences
    • Both Bactrian and Pagolak recall the mysterious Ursprache of Borges's Tlön, which contains no nouns but only impersonal verbs, and in which famous poems consist of a single enormous word.
    • The it in suffice it to say is an impersonal or indefinite pronoun, one that functions as a grammatical placeholder without supplying much real meaning.
    • A person is now ‘impersonal,’ as in an impersonal verb construction, as in ‘it is raining.’

Definition of impersonal in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Zarzuela is a musical drama consisting of alternating passages of dialogue, songs, choruses, and dancing, that originated in Spain in the seventeenth century. Its name comes from the Zarzuela palace, Madrid. It is also popular in Latin America. Zarzuela declined in the eighteenth century but revived in the early nineteenth century. The revived zarzuela dealt with more popular themes and was called género chico. A more serious version developed, known as género grande.