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implant

Translation of implant in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

/ɪmˈplænt; ɪmˈplɑːnt/
  • 1.1 [idea/ideal] inculcar*
    Example sentences
    • I want to say that although you cannot be possessed by demons they can implant thoughts in your mind through suggestion.
    • But he has spent decades implanting the idea that he is an icon of his people and the two are inseparable.
    • So, after a lot of trial and error, I finally got the spell right to implant the idea that he'd like to go on holiday.
    1.2 [embryo/pacemaker/hair] implantar
    Example sentences
    • He is the only Oregon surgeon now implanting the disc and will train other surgeons on the procedure.
    • So far in the United States, however, most of the chips have been implanted into the company's own employees.
    • A pacemaker is a small, battery-powered device that is implanted permanently into the body.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

/ɪmˈplænt; ɪmˈplɑːnt/
  • [embryo] implantarse
    Example sentences
    • Between five and seven days after ovulation, the fertilised egg implants into the wall of the uterus and produces root-like outgrowths called villi.
    • The males and females encounter each other briefly in the spring to mate, but the fertilized egg does not implant in the uterus until 10 or 11 months later.
    • Most would agree it begins when the fertilised egg implants in the woman's uterus.

noun/nombre

/ˈɪmplænt; ˈɪmplɑːnt/

Definition of implant in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.