There are 2 translations of impossible in Spanish:

impossible1

Pronunciation: /ɪmˈpɑːsəbəl; ɪmˈpɒsəbəl/

adj

  • 1.1 [task/job/request] imposible she's making impossible demands on you te está exigiendo lo imposible it's impossible for him/us/me to arrive by noon le/nos/me es imposible llegar a mediodía it's impossible for two people to use the machine at the same time es imposible que dos personas utilicen la máquina al mismo tiempo
    More example sentences
    • Drug use has become so widespread and accepted that it is impossible to enforce existing laws.
    • Representing such a lifetime's work on a single disc is a near impossible task.
    • Synthesising all of the various glycoforms in the laboratory would be an almost impossible task.
    1.2 (intolerable) [position/situation] intolerable to make life impossible for sb hacerle* la vida imposible a algn 1.3 [child/person] tremendo, increíble
    More example sentences
    • Those of you in that impossible situation have all my empathy, and best wishes for a happy resolution.
    • Clergy and parents are being put through impossible situations each and every year.
    • He added it would put people from Pool in an impossible situation.
    More example sentences
    • He was confusing enough when he was alive but now, when he's dead, he's impossible.

Definition of impossible in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of impossible in Spanish:

impossible2

n

  • to ask/do/attempt the impossible pedir*/hacer*/intentar lo imposible

Definition of impossible in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.