Translation of inarticulate in Spanish:

inarticulate

Pronunciation: /ˌɪnɑːrˈtɪkjələt; ˌɪnɑːˈtɪkjʊlət/

adj

  • 1 (in speech) [babbling/grunt] inarticulado; [person] con dificultad para expresarse she was inarticulate with rage no podía hablar de lo furiosa que estaba
    More example sentences
    • He becomes completely inarticulate and unable to close the deal, as it were, because he loves her too much!
    • It's the one where he played a dumb sullen inarticulate Brooklyn paint-store clerk.
    • He was verbally inarticulate and could not enunciate a clear concept or formulate ideas.
    More example sentences
    • He's a little dumbfounded at reviews of the film that criticize the repetitiveness of some dialogue or inarticulate speech, two of the aspects that make the film feel true.
    • Paradoxically, his inarticulate speech and inchoate thinking vividly express his frustration and anger: he has no skills with which to cope effectively with the inevitable set-backs of his life.
    • I would think long and hard before assuming that inarticulate speech and a gift for malapropism are indicators of stupidity.
  • 2 [Zool] inarticulado
    More example sentences
    • The Discinids are a small long-lived group of inarticulate brachiopods with chitinophosphatic shells.
    • The Brachiopoda for example, was present, but greatest diversity was shown by inarticulate brachiopods (like the one in the upper middle, from the Upper Cambrian of Iowa).
    • Quasimodaspis, along with the inarticulate brachiopods that are the only other fossils so far recovered from this locality, was probably transported from a shallower facies.

Definition of inarticulate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.