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indifferent

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈdɪfrənt/

Translation of indifferent in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 (uninterested) indiferenteindifferent to sth/sb he is quite indifferent to that sort of thing ese tipo de cosa le es or le resulta totalmente indiferente she seemed indifferent when she was told the news no pareció inmutarse cuando le dieron la noticia
    Example sentences
    • I couldn't really feel any great sympathy for him, and felt rather indifferent to his fate.
    • The third threat level is constituted by political systems that are indifferent to the expressed interests of the majority of the world's population.
    • I was rather indifferent to it at the time, but twenty years on, it sounds fresh and original.
  • 2 (mediocre) [performer] mediocre, del montón [colloquial/familiar] the acting was at best indifferent, at worst indescribable la actuación tuvo momentos mediocres y otros francamente nefastos with indifferent success con poco éxito good, bad or indifferent? ¿bueno, malo o regular?
    Example sentences
    • And but for an indifferent second season, he has piled on runs, averaging 49.7 from 35 first-class games.
    • Distracted by the regulatory settlement, it is easy to overlook how indifferent the company's second-quarter performance was.
    • What we definitely did see was indifferent bowling and fielding in the first half, and indifferent batting in the second.
    Example sentences
    • The opera was indifferent, but fairly successful with public.
    • He was a city boy, always had been, and his riding skills were fairly indifferent.
    • The indifferent weather is affecting the outcome of matches as batters are finding it hard to get any rhythm.

Definition of indifferent in:

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Word of the day vedar
vt
to prohibit …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.