Translation of infiltrate in Spanish:

infiltrate

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈfɪltreɪt; ˈɪnfɪl-; ˈɪnfɪltreɪt/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (penetrate) [group/territory] infiltrarse en the intelligence service had been infiltrated by political extremists un grupo de extremistas se había infiltrado en el servicio de inteligencia
    More example sentences
    • This is why I sometimes think we should infiltrate the Countryside Alliance - we'd get more cameras pointed at us then…
    • Now that we have a common picture of the communications architecture, we must discuss using information to successfully infiltrate an enemy's position.
    • He said intelligence agents and police informers had infiltrated villages in the area and worked as drivers, masons and hawkers for months to gather information about Veerappan and his men who were suspected to be hiding nearby.
    1.2 (insert)to infiltrate sb (into sth) they had infiltrated agents into our organization sus agentes se habían infiltrado en nuestra organización
    More example sentences
    • It reads like a blog, but you only have to look at a couple of the images to know this is a commercially popular side of US culture and quickly infiltrating ours.
    • Postmodernists claim that science, no less than religion and literature and philosophy, is infiltrated with culture.
    • The ensuing Meiji policy of modernization allowed Western ideas, institutions, and culture to infiltrate Japan.

Definition of infiltrate in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.