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ingress

Pronunciation: /ˈɪngres/

Translation of ingress in Spanish:

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • [formal] acceso (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • In fact, most ports are designed for easy ingress and egress.
    • Some facilities can limit their point of ingress and egress to only one or two entrances.
    • And so we're working on plans to create villages on the periphery of the marshes where we can provide quick egress and ingress to go into it and back out.
    Example sentences
    • Market Street, between Sauer and Harrison streets, will form part of the square, becoming an underpass, with an ingress, or entrance, in Kort Street and egress, or exit, after Harrison Street.
    • Though the entrance is the same, the ingress to the entertainment area is separate from the main living space.
    Example sentences
    • It was possible to deal with complaints in this way, because although the occasions of water ingress were not isolated, usually no damage was caused or any damage that was caused to stock or to decoration was of a minor nature only.
    • More restoration took place in 1868 following water ingress, which caused considerable damage.
    • Some apartments have been affected by water ingress.

Definition of ingress in:

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Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.