Translation of inscribe in Spanish:

inscribe

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈskraɪb/

vt

  • 1 1.1 (engrave) to inscribe sth (on sth) [words/letters] inscribir* algo (en algo) [design] grabar algo (en algo) to inscribe sth (with sth) [locket/headstone] grabar algo (con algo)
    More example sentences
    • He inscribed the word ‘boring’ across his recently written notes.
    • These were one liners written by groups of five poets who would each secretly inscribe a word on a slip of paper.
    • On their leaves he has inscribed words from Scottish ghost stories.
    More example sentences
    • Thousands of bones and tortoise shells were discovered there which had been inscribed with ancient Chinese characters.
    • He describes the frame's edges being inscribed with Japanese characters and expresses the wish to translate them.
    • The watches are inscribed with serial numbers.
    1.2 (fix, impress) (usu pass) grabar 1.3 [book] dedicar*
    More example sentences
    • And our prize books were duly inscribed copies of the following three.
    • Mailer, disappointed to find that Buckley had apparently neglected to inscribe the book, promptly flipped through the index to see whether he had been mentioned.
    • The book is inscribed at the front as belonging to a Mrs Janet Maule and is dated 25 June, 1701, although recipes have been added over a number of years.
  • 2 [Math] inscribir*
    More example sentences
    • It involves the solution of polygons given certain sides and angles between them, their mensuration, division by diagonals, circumscribing polygons around circles and inscribing polygons in circles.
    • Ptolemy calculated chords by first inscribing regular polygons of 3, 4, 5, 6 and 10 sides in a circle.
    • This he obtained by circumscribing and inscribing a circle with regular polygons having 96 sides.

Definition of inscribe in:

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peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.