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inseparable

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈseprəbəl/

Translation of inseparable in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [companions/friends/issues] inseparable to be inseparable from sb/sth ser* inseparable de algn/algo
    Example sentences
    • These meanings attract powerful emotions and can affect the patient's clinical condition and become inseparable from the individual's life history.
    • Mann may or may not have thought this himself, but he certainly felt that the pursuit of difficulty renewed the passions, and he knew that for him it was inseparable from ‘this phenomenon of life’.
    • Moreover, in true Yorkshire speech, the accent is inseparable from the dialect - though not many would be willing to practise the dialect today, even if they were familiar with the phraseology.
    Example sentences
    • You two were always so close, nearly inseparable at times.
    • Lin and Lydie, though they'd had a strong relationship from the beginning, grew so close they were practically inseparable.
    • By the end of our second day at Columbia Lake, my roommates and I had met our neighbours from next door, and we've been inseparable ever since.
    1.2 [Linguistics/Lingüística] inseparable
    Example sentences
    • Hence, verbs with the inseparable prefix ge- in their infinitive forms do not add an additional ge- in the past participle.
    Example sentences
    • Note that the verb anerkennen 'to recognize/acknowledge' is used both as a separable verb and (less commonly) as an inseparable verb.

Definition of inseparable in:

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Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.