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intense

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈtens/

Translation of intense in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 (great) [pain/cold/activity] intenso; [gratitude] profundo an intense blue/green un azul/verde intenso or vivo to my intense relief para mi gran alivio
    Example sentences
    • For weeks, the Syrians have been uprooting their troops and tanks, forced to withdraw under intense international and Lebanese pressure.
    • The public service and the defence force, under intense practical and political pressure, are players in what has become a compelling political thriller.
    • Under intense pressure it was forced to yield him.
    Example sentences
    • Well, again, the type of very vigorous, very intense activity generally is a matter of months after surgery like this.
    • Dutch researchers said recently that regular moderate exercise can burn energy and help shed those extra pounds or kilos more than short infrequent bursts of intense activity.
    • The announcement, made by junior agriculture minister Baroness Hayman in the House of Lords, followed a day of intense activity after the disease was confirmed at an Essex abattoir.
  • 2 2.1 (earnest) [youth] vehemente, apasionado she's terribly intense se lo toma todo tan en serio 2.2 (emotionally taxing) (American English/inglés norteamericano) duro
    Example sentences
    • He was a very earnest and intense young man, whose character was in keeping with his guitar playing.
    • On the one hand he's very enthusiastic and intense and can be serious, but he's also such a laugh, and so expressive that he wins you over.
    • No, I was not always so disciplined or serious, intense or passionate, but now I am.

Definition of intense in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.