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interweave

(past tense of/pasado de -wove or , -weaved past participle of/participio pasado de, -woven or , -weaved)
Pronunciation: /ˌɪntərˈwiːv; ˌɪntəˈwiːv/

Translation of interweave in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [threads/yarns] entretejer the leitmotiv is cunningly interwoven into the text el leitmotiv aparece acertadamente entretejido en el texto
    Example sentences
    • But instead of neatly-folded hosiery, out comes a congealed mass of tightly interwoven tights, socks, bras and assorted accessories.
    • As I walked along the paths that interweave amongst the foliage I came upon something I had never seen there before.
    • Jonkers Street was already crowded with vehicles and pedestrians, which seemed to interweave without touching each other.
    1.2
    (interwoven past participle of/participio pasado de)
    [threads] entretejido their lives were interwoven sus vidas estaban inextricablemente unidas

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 [threads/yarns] entretejerse 1.2 (mix) [paths] entrecruzarse*
    Example sentences
    • Sexual attitudes, knowledge, and sexual experiences in earlier years are closely interwoven with sexual desire.
    • The fact is that the settlement of the West was closely interwoven with the evolution of arms technology in America.
    • The rejection of linear time is, for many postmodern thinkers, closely interwoven with two other crucial issues.

Definition of interweave in:

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Word of the day trocha
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path …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.