Translation of jersey in Spanish:

jersey

Pronunciation: /ˈdʒərzi; ˈdʒɜːzi/

n (plural -seys)

  • 1 1.1 countable/numerable (sports shirt) camiseta (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Suede also proved that urban fashion isn't always about baggy jeans, jerseys and Snoop Dogg.
    • Do they simply add them to their jersey pockets or do they attach them to their bodies under their jerseys?
    • He was wondering why no one had noticed that he liked to wear long sleeves under his jersey.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable [Textiles] jersey (m), tejido (m) de punto a wool jersey dress un vestido de jersey or (Spain/España) de punto de lana
    More example sentences
    • When I moved my trade show uniform from an ottoman rib to a jersey knit, he adjusted the tape to make the new shirts look better than the old ones.
    • She settles on insulated booties, oversize pedals, and a clear slicker, which she slips over her jersey.
    • I wiped the smile right off her face, she says, like she used to wipe her school slate clean with a bit of spit and an unwinding jersey sleeve.
    More example sentences
    • Stretch shiny silk satin, light stretch silk twill, jersey, nylon taffeta, and leather dominate the collection.
    • I love working with jersey fabrics because it's easy to wear and comfortably drapes over a women's frame.
    • The fabrics are understated, using simple knits, jersey cotton and moleskins.
    1.3 countable/numerable (British English/inglés británico) sweater
  • 2 2.1
    (Jersey)
    (la isla de) Jersey
    2.2
    ( also Jersey)
    (cattle)raza de ganado vacuno Jersey

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.