There are 2 translations of juvenile in Spanish:

juvenile1

Pronunciation: /ˈdʒuːvənaɪl/

adj

  • 1.1 [Law/Derecho] (before noun/delante del nombre) [court] de menores; [delinquent/delinquency] juvenil 1.2 (childish) [pejorative/peyorativo] infantil
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    • Asked about the motivation for the vandalism, he said it was simply a case of very juvenile, immature peer pressure.
    • He probably thought that I was an immature and juvenile little child, which I can be, when I'm near Garret.
    • As juvenile and immaturely sexist as this may seem, you will never imagine how useful this can be.
    1.3 [publishing/literature] (American English/inglés norteamericano) infantil y juvenil
    More example sentences
    • Talk to people who live on the Brunshaw estate and the same themes come up time and time again: crime, juvenile nuisance, drug dealing, vandalism and anti-social behaviour.
    • But there are issues that should be tackled immediately, especially in the field of juvenile crime.
    • As juvenile crime rises, here and across the country, tonight's confessions of a York teenager make provocative reading.
    1.4 [Theater/Teatro] juvenile lead galán (masculine) joven
    More example sentences
    • Over 3,000 boys have already been seen, and the musical's appetite for new talent will remain high throughout its run, with cast changes a legal requirement for the juvenile actors every six months.
    • She didn't suffer fools gladly, which seemed to include all the juvenile actors she had to work with in TV.
    • The next day he received a letter from London saying his audition for the juvenile lead in a musical comedy had been successful.

Definition of juvenile in:

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Word of the day amnistiar
vt
to grant an amnesty to …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's War of Independence against Napoleon Bonaparte's French occupation was ignited by the popular revolt in Madrid on 2 May 1808 against the French army. With support from the Duke of Wellington, Spanish resistance continued for over five years in a guerra de guerrillas which gave the world the concept and the term guerrilla warfare. The autocratic Fernando VII was restored to the throne in 1814, and his first act was to abolish the progressive Constitution of Cadiz adopted in 1812.

There are 2 translations of juvenile in Spanish:

juvenile2

n

  • 1.1 [Law/Derecho] menor (masculine and feminine)
    More example sentences
    • But legal considerations plausibly have a great deal to do with increases in incarceration, capital punishment, and criminal prosecution of juveniles.
    • While the age of juveniles in the criminal justice system will be raised from 17 to 18, the only other change will see significant new powers put into the hands of the police.
    • In my judgment, Parliament has clearly, in sections 39 and 49, drawn a distinction between juveniles appearing in youth courts and juveniles appearing in adult courts.
    1.2 [Theater/Teatro]actor que hace papeles de joven
    More example sentences
    • Just 18, she played her first lead role in the film: she had been a juvenile in her previous appearance.
    • But, now and then, a juvenile comes along who actually deserves to be called an 'actor'.
    • Bill specialized in likeable but none-too-bright juveniles and young leads.

Definition of juvenile in:

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Word of the day amnistiar
vt
to grant an amnesty to …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's War of Independence against Napoleon Bonaparte's French occupation was ignited by the popular revolt in Madrid on 2 May 1808 against the French army. With support from the Duke of Wellington, Spanish resistance continued for over five years in a guerra de guerrillas which gave the world the concept and the term guerrilla warfare. The autocratic Fernando VII was restored to the throne in 1814, and his first act was to abolish the progressive Constitution of Cadiz adopted in 1812.