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kibitz

Pronunciation: /ˈkɪbəts; ˈkɪbɪts/

Translation of kibitz in Spanish:

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

(American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar]
  • 1.1 (look on at cards) entrometerse ([ en un juego de cartas ]) 1.2 (meddle) meter las narices [colloquial/familiar] 1.3 (chat) chacharear [colloquial/familiar], cotorrear [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • Gruff, inhospitable, and monolingual, the Russians sprawl in folding chairs, kibitz around card tables, smoke in defiance of ‘no smoking ‘signs, and studiously ignore customers who stray past their booths.
    • In addition to the formal legal process, a number of academics, lobbyists, journalists, and commentators have been kibitzing and barracking from the sidelines.
    • You take pictures from beginning to end - lots of them inside and outside of the plane - and even if you're a pilot, stay out of the way and don't kibitz.
    Example sentences
    • I basically advised them on the accuracy of the film and verisimilitude issues, kibitzed with them.
    • They visit, gossip, spy and tease; and while they are so engaged, the main character snoops and kibitzes with us.
    • A building can be organized to maximize interaction, so that people bump into each other and talk, drink, flirt, eat, complain, kibitz.

Definition of kibitz in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The current Spanish Constitution (Constitución Española) was approved in the Cortes Generales in December 1978. It describes Spain as a parliamentary monarchy, gives sovereign power to the people through universal suffrage, recognizes the plurality of religions, and transfers responsibility for defense from the armed forces to the government. The Constitution was generally well received, except in the Basque Country, whose desire for independence it did not satisfy. It is considered to have facilitated the successful transition from dictatorship to democracy.