There are 2 translations of kill in Spanish:

kill1

Pronunciation: /kɪl/

vt

  • 1 (cause death of) [person/animal] matar, dar* muerte a [formal] you'll get yourself killed te van a matar he killed himself se suicidó you'll kill yourself driving like that te vas a matar manejando or (Esp) conduciendo de esa manera he was killed by the rebels lo mataron los rebeldes, fue muerto por los rebeldes [formal] she was killed in a car crash se mató or murió en un accidente de coche nine people were killed in the fire nueve personas resultaron muertas en el incendio he was killed in the war murió en la guerra the disease kills thousands every year la enfermedad se cobra miles de víctimas anualmente it was drink that killed him la bebida acabó con él I'll kill him if he wakes me up! ¡como me despierte lo mato or (Esp) me lo cargo! [familiar/colloquial]
  • 2 2.1 (destroy) [hopes/enthusiasm] acabar con her arrival killed the conversation stone dead con su llegada se cortó la conversación en seco 2.2 (quash) [colloquial/familiar] [rumors] acabar con the opposition failed to kill the bill la oposición no logró estrangular el proyecto de ley 2.3 (spoil) [flavor/taste] estropear 2.4 (deaden) [pain] calmar 2.5 (use up) I went for a walk to kill time fui a dar un paseo para matar el tiempo I had an hour to kill tenía una hora sin nada que hacer
  • 3 [colloquial/familiar] 3.1 (cause discomfort) matar [familiar/colloquial] my feet/shoes are killing me los pies/zapatos me están matando [familiar/colloquial] 3.2 (tire out, exhaust) matar [familiar/colloquial] all this work is killing me tanto trabajo me está matando [familiar/colloquial] don't kill yourself! [iro] ¡cuidado, no te vayas a herniar! [irónico/ironical] 3.3 (amuse, shock) their jokes kill me me muero or (AmL tb) me mato de risa con sus chistes what killed me was the callous way he said it lo que me mató fue la brutalidad con la que lo dijo
  • 4 (switch off) [colloquial/familiar] [engine/lights] apagar*
  • 5 (consume) [colloquial/familiar] we killed a bottle of brandy nos liquidamos una botella de coñac [familiar/colloquial]

vi

  • matar she was dressed to kill se había vestido para matar or para dejar a todos boquiabiertos [familiar/colloquial]

Phrasal verbs

kill off

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
matar, acabar con the surviving members of the tribe were killed off by this disease esta enfermedad mató a or acabó con los sobrevivientes de la tribu they were killed off by the invaders fueron exterminados por los invasores acid rain is killing off these forests la lluvia ácida está acabando con or está destruyendo estas selvas

More definitions of kill

Definition of kill in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of kill in Spanish:

kill2

n

  • 1.1 c (act) the lion closed in for the kill el león se aprestó a caer sobre su presa he went in for the kill entró a matar to be in at the kill estar* presente en el momento culminante 1.2 u (animal, animals killed) presa (f)

More definitions of kill

Definition of kill in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.