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kite

Pronunciation: /kaɪt/

Translation of kite in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 (toy) cometa (feminine) or (in River Plate area also/en Río de la Plata también) barrilete (masculine) or (Central America/América Central) (Cuba) (Mexico/México) papalote (masculine) or (Venezuela) papagayo (masculine) or (Chile) volantín (masculine) go fly a kite! (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar] ¡vete a freír espárragos! [colloquial/familiar] to be as high as a kite [colloquial/familiar] estar* totalmente colocado or volado [colloquial/familiar], estar* hasta atrás (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar] to fly a kite (test reaction) tantear el terreno (lit) hacer* volar una cometa, volar* un papalote (Central America/América Central) (Cuba) (Mexico/México) or (Venezuela) un papagayo, encumbrar una cometa (Colombia) or (Chile) un volantín, remontar un barrilete (River Plate area/Río de la Plata)
    Example sentences
    • Despite one close call when it dropped so far that the line briefly got caught in the branches of a tree, I kept the kite airborne for the best part of half an hour.
    • Alex said that when he was about six, he remembers hiking to the top of a mountain with his grandparents and flying kites with his grandfather.
    • Small children ran about with kites or pet dogs, their nannies close behind.
  • 2 (bird) milano (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Initially, they could not figure out if the bird was a kite or an eagle.
    • He claims the kites interact with pheasants without any problems, and many gamekeepers in the area are supportive of the birds.
    • Proponents claimed that the improved stork habitat would benefit the kites as well, which also frequented that area.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • (American English/inglés norteamericano) to kite a check presentar un cheque sin fondos

Definition of kite in:

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.