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laissez-faire also: laisser-faire
American English: /ˌlɛseɪˈfɛr/
British English: /ˌlɛseɪˈfɛː/

Translation of laissez-faire in Spanish:

noun

uncountable
  • (before noun) (economics)
    (attitude)
    Example sentences
    • That doesn't mean advocating a policy of laissez-faire; it means helping all people to work together for their common good.
    • For example, the hunting of musk-oxen was banned at the end of World War I, but generally policy was laissez-faire.
    • David J. Hanson, a retired professor from nearby Syracuse University, has studied youth drinking and likes Montreal's laissez-faire policies.
    Example sentences
    • The original Western nineteenth-century route to modernization was associated with laissez-faire capitalism, individualism, and democracy.
    • In all of his complaining about laissez-faire and the free market, Polanyi somehow overlooks probably the single most important aspect of this system: freedom.
    • The laissez-faire philosophy of competitive capitalism translated into untold misery for the laboring classes in industrial cities.

Definition of laissez-faire in:

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