Translation of laissez-faire in Spanish:

laissez-faire

Pronunciation: /ˌleɪseɪˈfer; ˌleɪseɪˈfeə(r)/
laisser-faire

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • laissez faire (m), liberalismo (m) (económico); (before noun/delante del nombre) [economics] liberalista; [attitude] liberal
    More example sentences
    • That doesn't mean advocating a policy of laissez-faire; it means helping all people to work together for their common good.
    • For example, the hunting of musk-oxen was banned at the end of World War I, but generally policy was laissez-faire.
    • David J. Hanson, a retired professor from nearby Syracuse University, has studied youth drinking and likes Montreal's laissez-faire policies.
    More example sentences
    • The original Western nineteenth-century route to modernization was associated with laissez-faire capitalism, individualism, and democracy.
    • In all of his complaining about laissez-faire and the free market, Polanyi somehow overlooks probably the single most important aspect of this system: freedom.
    • The laissez-faire philosophy of competitive capitalism translated into untold misery for the laboring classes in industrial cities.

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Spain's War of Independence against Napoleon Bonaparte's French occupation was ignited by the popular revolt in Madrid on 2 May 1808 against the French army. With support from the Duke of Wellington, Spanish resistance continued for over five years in a guerra de guerrillas which gave the world the concept and the term guerrilla warfare. The autocratic Fernando VII was restored to the throne in 1814, and his first act was to abolish the progressive Constitution of Cadiz adopted in 1812.